Marmaladey Sausage Rolls

Marmaladey Sausage Rolls

When I was given a jar of Mackays Orange, Lemon and Ginger marmalade and a blank slate to cook whatever I liked with it for #mackaysmarmalademarch my mind went as blank as the aforementioned slate!  Being a devoted fan of the orange stuff, I’d already blogged all of my favourite things to do with it so coming up with something new was seriously challenging.  Looking back through my old recipes for inspiration I found one involving marmalade that was a particular favourite – sticky marmaladey cocktail sausages – and wondered how I could improve upon those little beauties…

The thing is, sweet marmalade and savoury sausage is a properly delicious combination, the more so when the marmalade has reduced while cooking into a lovely sticky glaze that you can lick off your fingers.  So I knew I wanted to stay with some finger-foodie, which led me eventually to these.

Sausage rolls are so easy to make that it really is a sin not to.  The secret is good quality sausages and ready rolled puff pastry.  Beyond that, anything goes, and half the fun is experimenting with different flavour combinations, like Thai red curry paste, or marmalade!  What I love is that the marmalade adds a lovely but subtle sweet note without overwhelming the sausage roll (another reason to get good quality sausages).  The black onion seeds add another savoury note as well a bit of texture, but you could use poppy seeds or sesame seeds if you have some of those handy.

The first batch of these taught me 1) not to get carried away with the amount of marmalade you use because it will get too watery and you’ll end up with the dread soggy bottoms, 2) not to glaze until you’re into the last 10 minutes of cooking time because a marmalade caramelises really really quickly, and 3) the combination worked just as well as I hoped it would.    

Marmaladey Sausage Rolls
Yields 10
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
35 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
35 min
Stuff you'll need...
  1. 250g pork sausages or sausage meat
  2. 375g ready-rolled puff pastry
  3. 2 tablespoons marmalade (I used Mackays Orange, Lemon and Ginger)
  4. 1 egg yolk
  5. 1 tbsp milk
  6. Butter or oil for greasing, or waxy baking parchment paper
  7. Black onion seeds (also called Nigella seeds)
Bake!
  1. Start by preheating the oven to 200C. While it’s heating up, prepare the baking sheet by greasing it or lining it with parchment paper.
  2. Lay the pastry out flat on a lightly floured surface, or more waxy baking parchment, and cut horizontally right down the middle so that you have two long strips. Mix together the egg yolk and milk to make an egg wash, then brush the far border of each strip of pastry with a little of the egg wash.
  3. If using sausages, cut a slit up the length of the sausage skin with scissors or a sharp knife and poke all the sausagemeat out into a mixing bowl. Add one tablespoon of marmalade and then snap on a pair of CSI vinyl gloves and get your hands stuck in, mixing it all up until the marmalade is combined well with the sausagemeat.
  4. Divide the sausage meat mixture in half and shape each piece into a long, thin sausage, along the length of the pastry towards the edge nearest you. Then roll the pastry away from you and up and over to seal in the sausage meat. Roll the whole thing over so the sealed edge is underneath.
  5. (If you’re making these ahead of time they can now be kept in the fridge for 24 hours, lightly covered with cling film, or they can even be frozen for up to 3 months and defrosted before cooking.)
  6. Use a sharp knife to cut into thumb-length sausage rolls, discarding the pastry ends. Score a couple of slits in the top of each one before lifting them carefully onto the greased/lined baking sheet. Pop in the oven, middle shelf, and bake for 25 minutes.
  7. Warm up the other tablespoon of marmalade in a small saucepan until it gets a little runny. After the sausage rolls have been in the oven for 25 minutes, remove from the oven and brush them with the runny marmalade before sprinkling all over with black onion seeds. Pop back into the oven for 5-10 minutes, until they are cooked through and golden.
fifigoesnom http://www.fifigoesnom.com/
Three Chimneys Hot Marmalade Pudding

Three Chimneys Hot Marmalade Pudding

I have no idea where the time has gone!  We popped stateside to visit Hubby’s folks for a couple of weeks in September and then I blinked and it’s almost November!  Which is probably just as well, because this delicious steamed pudding is perfect for the onset of Autumn.  As I sit here listening to the rain I think I can safely say that the comfort food season is officially open 😉

A couple of years ago we had some friends come visit us from New York. It was their first time in Scotland so we took them on the mother of all road trips, up through the Highlands and all the way across to Skye. The pair of them are as fond of good food as we are so having dragged them right up to the doorstep of the Three Chimneys it would have been a shame not to cross it and go in…

A meal at the Three Chimneys deserves a blog post all of its own, it really is that good, but today I’m going to rave just about the pudding which was worth the 400 mile round trip alone – the sponge was seductively dark but surprisingly light, and tasted most definitely and deliciously of marmalade which, as you might have noticed, is a particular favourite flavour of mine 🙂 If you ever ever make it up there don’t even look at anything else on the dessert menu, it will only tempt you away from one of the best puddings you’ll ever have.

Alternatively, stay home and have a go at making it yourself! We watched Nick Nairn make this on Saturday Kitchen one morning and it looked really really easy, like what-have-you-got-to-lose easy, so we tried it out courtesy of a recipe in The Guardian and it really was as easy as NN made it look. But, and probably most importantly, it comes a damn close second to the real thing!  We made this as our contribution for the family Christmas dinner last year and the parentals have already pre-ordered it for this year 🙂

The Three Chimneys serves theirs with a Drambuie custard but Hubby and I found a nice vanilla ice cream goes just as well, so serve up with whichever you prefer.

This pudding supposedly freezes well but we’ve never had enough leftover to try (!) If you do freeze it though, you can apparently reheat it by steaming it again, or popping it in the microwave for a few seconds. Hubby has plans to pan fry slices in a little butter but see comment above re lack of leftovers…

Three Chimneys Hot Marmalade Pudding
A sweet citrusy steamed pudding that is perfect for a cold night.
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Stuff you’ll need…
  1. 150g fine brown breadcrumbs
  2. 25g self-raising wholemeal flour (or white self-raising flour)
  3. 120g soft light brown sugar
  4. 120g butter
  5. 8 tbsp coarse-cut marmalade, plus 3 tbsp extra for serving
  6. 3 large eggs
  7. 1 rounded teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  8. Other stuff you’ll need…
  9. 3 pint pudding basin
  10. Large mixing bowl
  11. Small saucepan
  12. Large saucepan or stewpot, deep enough to fit the pudding basin inside with the pan lid firmly on
Mix!
  1. Start by buttering the pudding basin well, and then set to one side.
  2. Place the breadcrumbs, flour and sugar into the mixing bowl.
  3. Melt the butter and marmalade in a saucepan over a gentle heat. Pour the melted ingredients over the dry ingredients in the mixing bowl and then mix it all together thoroughly.
  4. In a seperate bowl, whisk the eggs until they’re frothy, and then beat gently into the pudding mixture until it is all blended together well.
  5. Dissolve the bicarbonate of soda in 1 tablespoon of cold water before stirring into the pudding mixture, which will increase in volume as it absorbs the bicarb.
  6. Finally, spoon the mixture into the buttered basin. Cover it with close-fitting lid or, alternatively, make a lid with circles of buttered greaseproof paper and foil, pleated together across the centre and tied securely around the rim of the basin (if that made no sense then click here to watch a very good video explaining what to do).
  7. Lower the pudding basin into the saucepan/stewpot of boiling water (the water should reach halfway up the side). Cover and simmer for two hours, checking the water throughout and topping up when needed (trust me, it will need it!).
  8. When the two hours is up, carefully remove the pudding basin and remove the lid. Put a plate on top, turn the basin upside down and wait for the pudding to unmould. It should do this on its own but if it needs help then give it a sound tap on top, or squeeze if the basin is plastic, and it should slide on off.
  9. Remove the basin and rejoice in the dark steamed perfection of your pudding!
  10. Melt the extra marmalade in a small saucepan, then drizzle all over the pudding as you’re serving it.
fifigoesnom http://www.fifigoesnom.com/
Marmalade Ice Cream

Marmalade Ice Cream

Marmalade on toast is one of my favourite things for breakfast, which is odd since I’m really not a fan of oranges and rarely, if ever, eat them.  Marmalade, however, I will scoff down quite merrily and any way I can – it makes a cracking sticky sweet glaze for cocktail sausages, an awesome steamed sponge pudding (it is the signature dish at The Three Chimneys on Skye and is deservedly legendary!) and thanks to this recommendation from my friend Ali B, marmalade also makes for an incredibly moreish ice cream flavour!

Legend has it that its name comes to us via Mary Queen of Scots, whose seasickness during her crossing from France to Scotland prompted her maids to cry “Ma’am est malade” and have the chef whip her up some of his sugary quincy seasickness cure.  I do believe this has been soundly debunked though… 😉

But I digress.  Back to marmalade ice cream, another perfectly Summery recipe!  I’ve adapted this from Claire Kelsey’s recipe as printed in The Metro a couple of weeks ago. Her version uses wholemeal bread and dark brown sugar to be the ‘toast’ to the marmalade, but the friend who tipped me off to this recipe used jamaica ginger cake instead, and I have to say the ginger marmalade combo is simply phenomenal, so that’s the way I’m blogging it.

If you’re looking to try making your own ice cream then this is a great recipe to start with as it doesn’t require an ice cream maker or any churning, just fold it and freeze it 🙂 The toughest thing you’ll have to do is decide if you’re going to go with shreds or without.  The correct answer is, obviously, with!  And one last thing, because it’s a no-churn ice cream the longer it’s in the freezer the more ice crystals will grow on it, so eat it quickly before it loses its creamy texture – trust me, this will not be difficult…

Makes 1 litre

Marmalade Ice Cream
Yields 1
Citrusy ice cream with zingy ginger cake bits that just needs folding and freezing (no ice cream maker necessary).
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Stuff you’ll need…
  1. 100g Jamaica Ginger Cake
  2. 2 large egg whites
  3. 1 tbsp icing sugar
  4. 400g Seville orange marmalade
  5. 350ml double cream
  6. Other stuff you’ll need…
  7. Electric hand whisker (or a tireless wrist!)
  8. Two mixing bowls
  9. Baking tray
Whisk!
  1. Preheat the oven to 170C. While it’s heating up, crumble the cake into coarse breadcrumbs that resemble rubble. Spread the crumbs on to a baking tray pop in the oven for about 10-15 minutes, until they are crisp but not hard – you’re aiming for them to provide a lovely crunchy contrast to the smooth ice cream. Set them aside until they’re cool.
  2. Then… make a meringue by whisking the egg whites in a scrupulously clean bowl. When they start to form soft peaks, add the icing sugar and continue to whisk for another minute until they turn glossy. Stop before the meringue becomes stiff.
  3. In your largest mixing bowl, mix the marmalade into the double cream, then whisk into soft peaks. Again, stop before it becomes too firm, otherwise you won’t be able to fold your mixtures together.
  4. Use a spatula or a very big spoon to add a little of the meringue to the marmalade and cream, and fold in, turning the bowl are you go. Then add the rest of the meringue into the bowl still using a folding motion. The idea is to retain as much air as possible in the mix.
  5. Lastly, scatter the cooled ginger cake crumbs over the top and repeat the folding and turning, mixing the crumbs through the cream.
  6. Put the mixture in a tub, cover and freeze overnight. This is scoopable almost straight from the freezer.
PS
  1. If you want to try it with ‘toast’, use 100g wholemeal bread instead of the Jamaica Ginger Cake, crumble into breadcrumbs and mix with 70g dark brown sugar before baking as above.
Adapted from Claire Kelsey, Marmalade on Toast Ice Cream
Adapted from Claire Kelsey, Marmalade on Toast Ice Cream
fifigoesnom http://www.fifigoesnom.com/
Sticky Marmaladey Sausages

Sticky Marmaladey Sausages

I love me some marmalade on toast, so finding out that this week was National Marmalade Week (25 Feburary to 3 March) just gave me excuses I didn’t need to attack the sticky orange stuff!  My favourite by far is Tiptree’s Tawny Thick Cut by Wilkin & Sons, which has a delicious abundance of shreds.  For the record, shredless is an abomination and will never be tolerated under my roof!

But marmalade is not just for toast!  Somewhere, somehow, I found out that marmalade goes insanely well with cocktail sausages… Really!  So in honour of Marmalade week may I present to you my exceedingly moreish Sticky Marmaladey Sausages – they’re great for handing round at parties, and even went down really well cold at an office charity buffet lunch type thing.

The recipe below (if you can call it a recipe!) is for party sized quantities, but it’s totally scalable  if you happen to have cocktail sausages lying around and fancy a cheeky hot snack 🙂

I used to buy cheap and cheerful marmalade for this, but I do think the better the marmalade the better the glaze, so don’t be afraid to use whatever you have on hand for toast.  Your tastebuds will thank you for it!

Sticky Marmaladey Sausages
Gooey, sweet-tart marmalade goes perfectly with the sausages, perfect for parties or a cheeky weekend snack.
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Cook Time
40 min
Cook Time
40 min
You’ll need
  1. 3-4 tablespoons of good marmalade
  2. Approximately 50 uncooked cocktail sausages
Instructions
  1. Cook!
  2. First things first, set the oven to 200c.
  3. While the oven is warming up, melt the marmalade in a saucepan and then pour the gooey loveliness over the sausages in the roasting tin and mix until coated.
  4. Place the lot in the pre-warmed oven for 15/20 minutes, and then take the tin out and give the sausages a good shoogle about. Don’t worry if the marmalade looks a little runny, it will eventually thicken back up again.
  5. Put it all back in the oven for another 15/20 minutes, at which point the marmalade should have become a magical sticky delicious glaze all over the sausages. The sausages will be cooked through after 30/40 minutes so you can take them out at this point, but if you like your sausages a little browner then put them back in the oven until they have reached your preferred shade.
  6. Once out, give them a few minutes to cool down, and then tuck right in!
fifigoesnom http://www.fifigoesnom.com/